Book Printed and for Sale on Amazon Again

Dear Book Updates Newsletter,

I promised (someone at some point) that I’d tell ya’ll when my book went back up for sale on Amazon and now it is (right here). Who knows why it disappeared for a while.

  1. Write book
  2. Editing
  3. Design / layout
  4. Proofing
  5. Print book

The publisher is the only one who has any hard copies of the book right now. They’re promoting it at a conference in Chicago. In a few more weeks it should be available at stores or your mailbox (even though Amazon is hedging their bets by saying May 1).

I’ve been crazy busy finalizing the audio tracks (164 of them!) and getting the download website built (not really my specialty) but it should all be drawing to a close soon.

Thanks again for the interest and support.

Comments

  1. Rev Matt,

    You’re officially the first person to inform me that you’ve got the book!

    I’m glad you’re enjoying it so far. If you’re ever in a really good mood about the book, would you mind clicking the “Write your own review” button in the side bar and putting some kind words on Amazon about it? According to my publisher, Amazon reviews (positive ones) are the real currency of online book selling…whatever that means.

  2. Hey, so I bought your book some time ago, and have only just found the time to start implementing some of the strategies. My house is now somewhat covered in labels, and I have a Chinese person moving in with me in a few days. She speaks very little, I mean very little, English. Your book suggests hanging out with people who speak little English; thus, she is moving in. But, I forsee this being somewhat frustrating for us both because my Chinese is also very poor. Any tips on the best ways to communicate, without having to constantly turn to a dictionary all day?? Cheers..

  3. I’ve bought your book recently. It’s great, but I found some mistakes/typos (which I don’t see on http://chinese247book.com/corrections ).

    1. page 61. When you describe the three different “i” sounds you say that the one in ‘qi’, like the English “ee” will be marked as bold. But this is _not_ how it’s used in the pinyin chart and other parts of the book.

    This will probably be the most confusing thing in the book for someone who doesn’t know what’s this about or not 100% sure in his knowledge. 🙁

    2. p. 66. Same issue. You are saying that the ‘i’ in xiexie is the bold one in pinyin chart. But it’s not. 🙂

    3. p 98 bottom. “Shengdan kuaile” in pinyin, but “kuaile shengdan” in hanzi.

    4. p 152. Ordering three times the same dish? In China?? That cannot be right! :))

    5. p 185. The two sentences with keyi don’t differ at all in print. So, it’s confusing, how can they mean two different things? For the next edition of your book, you should probably mark somehow (with bold?) that the stress is different in the two.

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